Strange country : modernity and nationhood in Irish writing since 1790 / Seamus Deane.

This book traces the emergence of a self-consciously national tradition in Irish writing from the era of the French Revolution and, specifically, from Edmund Burke's counter-revolutionary writings. From Gerald Griffin's The Collegians, to Bram Stoker's Dracula, from James Hardiman...

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Bibliographic Details
Online Access:Electronic book from Oxford Scholarship Online
Main Author: Deane, Seamus, 1940-2021.
Format: eBook
Language:English
Published:Oxford : Clarendon Press ; New York : Oxford University Press, 1997.
Series:Clarendon lectures in English literature ; 1995.
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Summary:This book traces the emergence of a self-consciously national tradition in Irish writing from the era of the French Revolution and, specifically, from Edmund Burke's counter-revolutionary writings. From Gerald Griffin's The Collegians, to Bram Stoker's Dracula, from James Hardiman's Irish Minstrelsy to Synge, Yeats, and Joyce, Irish writing is dominated by a number of inherited issues - those of national character, of conflict between discipline and excess, of division between the languages of economics and sensibility, of modernity and backwardness. Almost all the activities of Irish print culture - its novels, songs, historical analyses, typefaces, poems - take place within the limits imposed by this complex inheritance. In the process, Ireland created a national literature that was also a colonial one. This was and is an achievement that is only now being fully recognised.
Physical Description:1 online resource (269 pages)
Format:Master and use copy. Digital master created according to Benchmark for Faithful Digital Reproductions of Monographs and Serials, Version 1. Digital Library Federation, December 2002.
Bibliography:Includes bibliographical references (pages 235-258) and index.
ISBN:9780191674389
0191674389
9780198184904
0198184905
Access:Access limited to authorized users.